The sharing economy is an economic system where private individuals share, exchange, rent or buy services and goods between them.

The sharing economy includes renting our homes and cars and offering help and doing services for payment. What  it means to your tax and whether you have to pay VAT depends on which type of activity you are involved in.

When you rent out a room or a home you live in yourself, you have to pay tax and possibly VAT of the income you make. This applies no matter how the renting is facilitated and it includes bed and breakfast and Airbnb, for example.

Read more about renting out a room or a home you live in personally

Read more about renting out a holiday home

Driving together is not subject to tax.

Driving together means that two or more people going the same way drive in one car and share the transport expenses. This could be if you give a colleague a lift to work.

If you drive to work together, neither your nor your colleague's deduction for transport between home and work will be affected.

If you get paid for giving somebody a lift, it is tax free as long as the payment you receive does not exceed your passenger's share of the total costs related to the driving. If you get paid more for giving somebody a lift that the actual driving costs, the income is subject to tax.

Renting out your car, boat or mobile home is subject to tax

When you rent out your car, boat or mobile home to others occasionally, for example via GoMore, Boatflex or Out2Camp, you have to pay tax and possible VAT on your income.

Read about renting out your car

Transporting goods for others is subject to tax

If you occasionally transport goods for others, via TagDetMed and Mover, for example, you must pay tax and possibly VAT on your income.

Read more about transporting goods for others

When you provide services for others and get paid for it, you have to pay tax and possible VAT on your income. This applies no matter how the services were facilitated and includes, for example, HappyHelper and Jobbi.

Read more about providing services for others

If you sell private goods such as clothes and furniture that you bought for personal use, you do not have to pay tax on the amount. The same applies if you exchange your private goods with others.

If, however, you sell goods that you bought with the intent on selling them on, or you rent out private goods, you have to pay tax on the profit you make.

This applies no matter how the selling or exchanging was facilitates, including flea markets and Den Blå Avis.

It is irrelevant whether the goods sold are new or used, where you bought them or how long you have had these goods. The only thing that is relevant is whether you bought the goods to sell them on.

Danish tax legislation does not define what you are allowed to sell. However, other legislation prohibits that you, for example, sell stolen goods or euphoriants and that require a licence or occasional permission to sell alcohol.

This is what you do

If the sale or exchange is private: You enter your profit in box 20 in your tax assessment notice and field 250 in your preliminary income assessment.

If the sale or exchange is for business purposes: You enter your profit in box 11 in your tax assessment notice and in field 221 in your preliminary income assessment.

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